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America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2021

Immunization

Childhood vaccination is essential because it helps provide immunity before children are exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases. Data on vaccination coverage are used to identify groups at risk of vaccine-preventable diseases, monitor coverage, and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to increase coverage.

Indicator HC3.A: Estimated vaccination coverage of U.S. children by age 24 months with the combined 7-vaccine series by poverty status, birth years 2011–2016
Indicator HC3.A: Estimated vaccination coverage of U.S. children by age 24 months with the combined 7-vaccine series by poverty status, birth years 2011–2016

NOTE: The combined 7-vaccine series consists of 4 doses (or more) of diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and pertussis (DTP) vaccines, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DT), or diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and any acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccines; 3 doses (or more) of poliovirus vaccines; 1 dose (or more) of any measles-containing vaccine; the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines (3 or 4 doses, depending on product type); 3 doses (or more) of hepatitis B vaccines; 1 dose (or more) of varicella vaccine; and 4 doses (or more) of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). The recommended immunization schedule for children is available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/easy-to-read/child.html. Poverty status is based on family income and household size using U.S. Census Bureau poverty thresholds for the year of data collection. Data for the 2016 birth year are from survey years 2017, 2018, and 2019.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, National Immunization Survey—Child.

Indicator HC3.B: Percentage of adolescents ages 13–17 years with routinely recommended-for-age vaccinations, 2011–2019
Indicator HC3.B: Percentage of adolescents ages 13–17 years with routinely recommended-for-age vaccinations, 2011–2019

NOTE: The routine vaccination recommendation for children beginning at ages 11–12 includes tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccines (Tdap), meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MenACWY), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines (2 or 3 doses, depending on when first HPV vaccine dose is received). The recommended immunization schedule for adolescents is available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/easy-to-read/preteen-teen.html.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, National Immunization Survey—Teen.

  • For children born in 2016, those in families with incomes below the poverty threshold had lower vaccination coverage (61%) compared with those in families with incomes at or above the poverty level (73%).
  • Among children born since 2011, the percentage who received the recommended combined 7-vaccine series (4:3:1:3*:3:1:4) by age 24 months has remained steady at about 69%.
  • In 2019, vaccination coverage for one dose (or more) of tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) was 90%, and coverage for one dose (or more) of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was 89%. Vaccination coverage for one dose (or more) of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was 72%, and up-to-date (UTD) coverage was 54% in 2019.
  • Since 2011, vaccination coverage for adolescents ages 13–17 years has steadily increased for the routinely recommended vaccinations for adolescents.

table icon HC3A HTML Table | HC3B HTML Table