ChildStats.gov—Forum on Child and Family Statistics
faces of children
Home  |  About the Forum  |  Publications  |  Help
Search

America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2018

Education Figures

Figure ED1: Percentage of children ages 3–5 who were read to 3 or more times in the last week by a family member by mother's education, selected years 1993–2016
Percentage of children ages 3–5 who were read to 3 or more times in the last week by a family member by mother's education, selected years 1993–2016

NOTE: Estimates are based on children ages 3–5 who have yet to enter kindergarten. Children without mothers in the home are not included in estimates. Prior to 2012, National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES) surveys were administered via telephone with an interviewer. NHES:2012 used self-administered paper-and-pencil questionnaires that were mailed to respondents. For NHES:2016, all sampled households received initial contact by mail. While the majority of respondents completed paper questionnaires, a small sample of cases was part of a Web experiment with mailed invitations to complete the survey online. Measurable differences in estimates between 2012, 2016, and prior years could reflect actual changes in the population, or the changes could be due to the mode change. Some data have been revised from previously published figures.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Household Education Surveys Program.

Figure ED2.A: Average mathematics scale scores for students in Grades 4 and 8, selected years 1990–2015
Average mathematics scale scores for students in Grades 4 and 8, selected years 1990–2015

NOTE: Results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics assessment are reported as a composite scale that combines the results of separately estimated scales for each of the content areas: (1) number of properties and operations; (2) measurement; (3) geometry; (4) data analysis, statistics, and probability; and (5) algebra. (Note that measurement and geometry make up one of four content areas at Grade 12.) The scale ranges from 0 to 500 for Grades 4 and 8 and 0 to 300 for Grade 12. Prior to 1996, testing accommodations (e.g., extended time, small group testing) for children with disabilities and limited-English-proficient students were not permitted. In 1996, scores are provided for both the assessment with and assessment without accommodations to show comparability across the assessments.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress.

Figure ED2.B: Average mathematics scale scores for students in Grade 12 by race and Hispanic origin, 2005, 2013, and 2015
Average mathematics scale scores for students in Grade 12 by race and Hispanic origin, 2005, 2013, and 2015

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress.

Figure ED2.C: Average reading scale scores for students in Grades 4, 8, and 12 selected years 1992–2015
Average reading scale scores for students in Grades 4, 8, and 12 selected years 1992–2015

NOTE: The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading assessment scale is a composite combining separately estimated scales for each type of reading (literacy and informational) specified by the reading framework. The scale ranges from 0 to 500. The 2000 assessment only included data for Grade 4, and the 2003, 2007, and 2011 assessments only included data for Grades 4 and 8. In the early years of the assessment, testing accommodations (e.g., extended time, small group testing) for children with disabilities and limited-English-proficient students were not permitted. In 1998, scores are provided for both the assessment with and assessment without accommodations to show comparability across the assessments.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress.

Figure ED3: Percentage of public high school students enrolled in selected secondary mathematics and science courses, school year 2013–14
Percentage of public high school students enrolled in selected secondary mathematics and science courses, school year 2013–14

NOTE: Data reflect the percentage of students in Grades 9–12 who were enrolled in each course during the 2013–14 school year. Advanced mathematics courses cover the following topics: trigonometry, trigonometry/algebra, trigonometry/analytic geometry, trigonometry/math analysis, analytic geometry, math analysis, math analysis/analytic geometry, probability and statistics, and pre-calculus. Data have been revised since previous publication in America's Children.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Of?ce for Civil Rights, Civil Rights Data Collection and U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data.

Figure ED4: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who have completed high school by race and Hispanic origin, 1980–2016
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who have completed high school by race and Hispanic origin, 1980–2016

NOTE: NH is non-Hispanic. From 1980 to 1991, high school completion was measured by the completion of 4 years of high school rather than the actual attainment of a high school diploma or equivalent. Diploma equivalents include alternative credentials obtained by passing exams such as the GED test. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately and combined for reporting according to the 1997 U.S. Office of Management and Budget Standards for Data on Race and Ethnicity. Race categories exclude persons of Hispanic ethnicity.

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, School Enrollment Supplement.

Figure ED5: Percentage of youth ages 16–19 who are neither enrolled in school nor working by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 1985–2017
Percentage of youth ages 16–19 who are neither enrolled in school nor working by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 1985–2017

NOTE: Data relate to the labor force and enrollment status of persons ages 16–19 in the civilian noninstitutionalized population during an "average" week of the school year. School refers to both high school and college. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey.

Figure ED6: Percentage of high school completers who were enrolled in college the October immediately after completing high school by race and Hispanic origin, 1980–2016
Percentage of high school completers who were enrolled in college the October immediately after completing high school by race and Hispanic origin, 1980–2016

NOTE: Enrollment in college as of October of each year for individuals ages 16–24 who had completed high school earlier in the calendar year. High school completion includes GED recipients. Data have been revised since previous publication in America's Children. Due to some short-term data fluctuations associated with small sample sizes, moving averages are used to produce more stable estimates for the race and Hispanic origin data. A 3-year moving average is the weighted average of the estimates for the year prior to the reported year, the reported year, and the following year. For 2016, a 2-year moving average is used, reflecting an average of the 2015 and 2016 estimates. Beginning in 2003, those in a given racial category represent those reporting only that race. Data from 2003 onward are not directly comparable with data from earlier years. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately and combined for reporting according to the 1997 U.S. Office of Management and Budget Standards for Data on Race and Ethnicity. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, School Enrollment Supplement.