ChildStats.gov—Forum on Child and Family Statistics
faces of children
Home  |  About the Forum  |  Publications  |  Data Sources  |  Help
Search

America's Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

Injury Mortality

Unintentional injury (accidents), homicides, and suicides are the leading causes of death among young adults ages 18–24. Public health prevention efforts to reduce fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes include promoting seatbelt use and initiatives to reduce drinking and driving.60 Public health efforts to reduce violence include strategies to provide youth with skills, safe environments, supportive relationships, and opportunities for success.61

Indicator Health6.A: Death rates among young adults ages 18–24, all causes, all injury causes, and selected mechanisms of injury, 1990–2010
Death rates among young adults ages 18–24, all causes, all injury causes, and selected mechanisms of injury, 1990–2010

Indicator Health6.B: Homicide and suicide rates among young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, and gender, 2010
Homicide and suicide rates among young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, and gender, 2010

NOTE: The 1977 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards for data on race and ethnicity were used. Data for Hispanic origin and specified race populations other than White, non-Hispanic and Black, non-Hispanic should be interpreted with caution because of inconsistencies between reporting race and Hispanic origin on death certificates, censuses, and surveys.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System.

  • In 2010, the injury death rate for young adults ages 18–24 was 61.2 per 100,000. Injuries accounted for 76 percent of the deaths in this age group.
  • In 2010, the rate of death due to motor vehicle traffic injuries was 19.0 per 100,000, and the rate of death due to firearm injuries was 17.1 per 100,000. Motor vehicle traffic and firearm injuries accounted for more than 50 percent of the deaths due to injuries in this age group.
  • Between 1990 and 2010, the rate of death due to motor vehicle injuries declined from 36.1 per 100,000 to 19.0 per 100,000. During this time period, the rate of death due to firearm injuries declined from 28.4 per 100,000 to 17.1 per 100,000.
  • In 2010, the homicide rate for Black, non-Hispanic males (93.1 per 100,000) was more than 18 times the rate for White, non-Hispanic males (5.1 per 100,000) and four times the rate for Hispanic males (23.1 per 100,000).
  • In 2010, the suicide rate was 24.7 per 100,000 for White, non-Hispanic males; 14.6 per 100,000 for Black, non-Hispanic males; and 12.6 per 100,000 for Hispanic males.

table icon YAHEALTH6 HTML Table

60 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Injury Prevention and Control. (2012). Motor vehicle safety. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/.

61 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Injury Prevention and Control. (2012). Saving lives and protecting people: Preventing violence against children and youth. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/injury/about/focus-cm.html.