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America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012

Economic Circumstances Figures

Indicator ECON1.A: Percentage of children ages 0–17 living in poverty by race, Hispanic origin, and family type, 1980–2010
The data in this figure is represented in table Econ1a

NOTE: In 2010, the poverty threshold for a two-parent, two-child family was $22,113. Historically, the proportion of children in male-householder families has been small. Select data for this group are available as part of Detailed Tables at http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/index.html.

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplements.

Indicator ECON1.B: Percentage of children ages 0–17 by family income relative to the poverty line, 1980–2010
The data in this figure is represented in table Econ1B

NOTE: The graph shows income categories derived from the ratio of a family's income to the family's poverty threshold. In 2010, the poverty threshold for a family of four with 2 children was $22,113. For example, a family of four with 2 children would be living below 50% of the poverty threshold if their income was less than $11,056 (50 percent of $22,113). If the same family's income was at least $22,113 but less than $44,226 the family would be living at 100–199% of the poverty threshold.

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplements.

Indicator ECON2: Percentage of children ages 0–17 living with at least one parent employed year round, full time by family structure, 1980–2010
The data in this figure is represented in table Econ2

SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplements.

Indicator ECON3: Percentage of children ages 0–17 in food-insecure households by poverty status, selected years 1995–2010
The data in this figure is represented in table Econ3

NOTE: Food-insecure households are those in which either adults or children or both were "food insecure," meaning that, at times, they were unable to acquire adequate food for active, healthy living for all household members because they had insufficient money and other resources for food. Statistics for 1996–1998 and 2000 are omitted because they are not directly comparable with those for other years. The food security measure is based on data collected annually in the Food Security Supplement to the Current Population Survey. The criteria for classifying households as food insecure reflect a consensus judgment of an expert working group on food security measurement. For detailed explanations, see Bickel, G., et al., revised 2000, Guide to measuring household food security, Food and Nutrition Service; and Coleman-Jensen, A., et al., 2011, Household food security in the United States in 2010 (ERR-125), Economic research Service.

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement; tabulated by Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service and Food and Nutrition Service.