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America's Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

Nonfatal Violent Victimization Rates

Young adults who experience, witness, or feel threatened by violence frequently experience long-term effects as a result. In addition to any direct physical harm suffered, serious violence can have an adverse effect on victims' mental health status and may increase the likelihood that victims will commit acts of serious violence.62, 63 Such negative repercussions can damage the ability of young adults to maintain employment, engage in positive interpersonal relationships, and achieve financial independence.

This indicator presents data for young adults who directly experienced nonfatal violent victimization, which includes rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated and simple assault.

Indicator Health7: Nonfatal violent victimization rate per 1,000 persons ages 18–24 by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 1993–2012
Nonfatal violent victimization rate per 1,000 persons ages 18–24 by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 1993–2012

NOTE: For data before 2003, the 1977 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards for data on race and ethnicity were used to classify persons into racial groups. The revised 1997 OMB standards were used for data from 2003 and later years. Data from 2003 onward are not directly comparable with data from earlier years. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey.

  • In 2012, the overall nonfatal violent victimization rate among young adults ages 18–24 was 41.0 per 1,000, a decline of 71 percent from 1993, when the rate was 141.6 per 1,000.
  • During the 20-year period from 1993 to 2012, both males and females ages 18–24 experienced significant declines in the rate of nonfatal violent victimization. The rate for males declined by three-fourths, from 161.7 to 41.3 per 1,000 males, and the rate for females declined by two-thirds, from 121.6 to 40.7 per 1,000 females.
  • Between 1993 and 2012, the nonfatal violent victimization rate declined from 176.2 to 46.1 per 1,000 for White, non-Hispanic males; from 126.8 to 40.2 per 1,000 for Black, non-Hispanic males; and from 140.9 to 31.9 per 1,000 for Hispanic males.
  • Between 1993 and 2012, the rate of nonfatal violent victimization declined from 116.5 to 49.9 per 1,000 for White, non-Hispanic females; from 186.8 to 27.9 per 1,000 for Black, non-Hispanic females; and from 73.7 to 30.4 per 1,000 for Hispanic females.

table icon YAHEALTH7 HTML Table

62 Turner, H.A., Finkelhor, D., and Ormrod, R. (2006). The effect of lifetime victimization on the mental health of children and adolescents. Social Science & Medicine, 62, 13–27.

63 Schreck, C.J., Stewart, E.A., and Osgood, D.W. (2008). A reappraisal of the overlap of violent offenders and victims. Criminology, 46(4), 871–905.