ChildStats.gov—Forum on Child and Family Statistics
faces of children
Home  |  About the Forum  |  Publications  |  Data Sources  |  Help
Search

America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2016

Demographic Background

Racial and ethnic diversity in the United States has increased dramatically in the last 35 years. This growth was first evident among children, a population projected to become even more diverse in the years to come.

Figure 1: Percentage of U.S. children ages 0–17 by race and Hispanic origin, 1980–2015 and projected 2016–2050
Percentage of U.S. children ages 0–17 by race and Hispanic origin, 1980–2015 and projected 2016–2050

NOTE: The abbreviation NH refers to non-Hispanic origin. Each group represents the non-Hispanic population, with the exception of the Hispanic category itself. People of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately. Race data from 2000 onward are not directly comparable with data from earlier years.

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division.

  • In 2020, fewer than half of all U.S. children ages 0–17 are projected to be White, non-Hispanic, down from 74 percent in 1980 and 52 percent in 2015. By 2050, only 39 percent of all U.S. children are projected to be White, non-Hispanic.
  • Hispanic children represented 25 percent of U.S. children in 2015, up from 9 percent in 1980. By 2020, they are projected to represent 26 percent of all U.S. children and 32 percent by 2050.
  • In 2015, Black, non-Hispanic children represented 14 percent of all U.S. children, down from 15 percent in 1980. By 2020, they are projected to represent 14 percent of all U.S. children and 13 percent by 2050.
  • Since 2000, Asian, non-Hispanic children have increased from 3.5 percent of all U.S. children to 5 percent in 2015. By 2020, they are projected to represent 5 percent of all U.S. children and 7 percent by 2050.
  • In 2000, non-Hispanic children of two or more races represented 2 percent of all U.S. children. By 2015, they represented 4 percent of all U.S. children. By 2020, they are projected to represent 5 percent of all U.S. children and 8 percent by 2050.
  • American Indian and Alaska Native, non-Hispanic children represented 0.9 percent of all U.S. children in 2015, up from 0.8 percent in 1980. By 2020, they are projected to represent 0.8 percent of all U.S. children and 0.7 percent by 2050.
  • Between 2000 and 2015, the proportion of Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, non-Hispanic children remained unchanged at 0.2 percent of all U.S. children. The proportion is projected to remain unchanged at 0.2 percent between 2020 and 2050.

table icon POP3 HTML Table