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America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2013

Health Care Figures

Indicator HC1: Percentage of children ages 0–17 covered by health insurance at some time during the year by type of health insurance, 1987–2011
Percentage of children ages 0–17 covered by health insurance at some time during the year by type of health insurance, 1987–2011

NOTE: Public health insurance for children consists primarily of Medicaid, but also includes Medicare, Children's Health Insurance Programs (CHIP), and Tricare, the health benefit program for members of the armed forces and their dependents. Estimates beginning in 1999 include follow-up questions to verify health insurance status. Children are considered to be covered by health insurance if they had public or private coverage any time during the year. The data from 1996 to 1999 have been revised since initially published. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/data/usernote/index.html. The data for 1999 through 2009 were revised to reflect the results of enhancements to the editing process. See http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/data/usernote/index.html. Implementation of Census 2010-based population controls began in 2010.

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, unpublished tables from the Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplements.

Indicator HC2: Percentage of children ages 0–17 with no usual source of health care by type of health insurance, 1993–2011
Percentage of children ages 0–17 with no usual source of health care by type of health insurance, 1993–2011

NOTE: Children with both public and private insurance coverage are placed in the private insurance group. Emergency rooms are excluded as a usual source of care. A break is shown in the lines because in 1997 the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was redesigned. Data for 1997–2011 are not strictly comparable with earlier data.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey.

Indicator HC3.A: Percentage of children ages 19–35 months with the 4:3:1:3:3:1 combined series of vaccinations by poverty status, 2002–2011
Percentage of children ages 19–35 months with the 4:3:1:3:3:1 combined series of vaccinations by poverty status, 2002–2011

NOTE: The 4:3:1:3:3:1 series consists of 4 doses (or more) of diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and pertussis (DTP) vaccines, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DT), or diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and any acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccines; 3 doses (or more) of poliovirus vaccines; 1 dose (or more) of any measles-containing vaccine; 3 doses (or more) of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines; 3 doses (or more) of hepatitis B vaccines; and 1 dose (or more) of varicella vaccine. The recommended immunization schedule for children is available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html. In 2009, a Hib vaccine shortage affected the series estimate. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended an interim suspension of the booster dose for healthy children. This was during the time when most children in the 2009 National Immunization Survey would have been eligible for the Hib vaccine booster dose.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases and National Center for Health Statistics, National Immunization Survey.

Indicator HC3.B: Percentage of adolescents ages 13–17 with the routinely recommended-for-age vaccinations, 2006–2011
Percentage of adolescents ages 13–17 with the routinely recommended-for-age vaccinations, 2006–2011

NOTE: Data collection for 2006 and 2007 was only performed during the fourth quarter. Human papillomavirus (HPV) coverage level indicates females initiating the 3-dose series. Routinely recommended vaccines for administration beginning at ages 11–12 include tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) and meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY) vaccines (both one dose), and HPV vaccine (3 doses). Since the routine recommendation for the administration of HPV vaccine to males was not published until December 2011, those vaccination rates are not reported in this figure.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases and National Center for Health Statistics, National Immunization Survey—Teen.

Indicator HC4.A: Percentage of children ages 5–17 with a dental visit in the past year by age and poverty status, 1999–2011
Percentage of children ages 5–17 with a dental visit in the past year by age and poverty status, 1999–2011

NOTE: From 1999 to 2000, children were identified as having a dental visit in the past year by asking parents "About how long has it been since your child last saw or talked to a dentist?" In 2001 and later years, the question was, "About how long has it been since your child last saw a dentist?" Parents were directed to include all types of dentists, such as orthodontists, oral surgeons, and all other dental specialists, as well as dental hygienists.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey.

Indicator HC4.B: Percentage of children ages 2–4 with a dental visit in the past year by poverty status, 1999–2011
Percentage of children ages 2–4 with a dental visit in the past year by poverty status, 1999–2011

NOTE: From 1999 to 2000, children were identified as having a dental visit in the past year by asking parents "About how long has it been since your child last saw or talked to a dentist?" In 2001 and later years, the question was, "About how long has it been since your child last saw a dentist?" Parents were directed to include all types of dentists, such as orthodontists, oral surgeons, and all other dental specialists, as well as dental hygienists.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey.

Indicator HC4.C: Percentage of children ages 5–17 with untreated dental caries (cavities) by age and poverty status, 1988–1994, 1999–2004, 2005–2008, and 2009–2010
Percentage of children ages 5–17 with untreated dental caries (cavities) by age and poverty status, 1988–1994, 1999–2004,  2005–2008, and 2009–2010

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.