ChildStats.gov—Forum on Child and Family Statistics
faces of children
Home  |  About the Forum  |  Publications  |  Data Sources  |  Help
Search

America's Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

Health and Safety Figures

Indicator Health1: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 with a usual source of health care by insurance type, 1997–2012
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 with a usual source of health care by insurance type, 1997–2012

NOTE: A small number of young adults were covered by both Medicaid or other public health insurance and private insurance and are only included in the private insurance coverage group. Hospital emergency rooms are excluded as a usual source of care.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey.

Indicator Health2: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who are obese by race and Hispanic origin, selected years 1988–2010
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who are obese by race and Hispanic origin, selected years 1988–2010

NOTE: Obesity is defined as body mass index ≥ 30 kilograms per meter squared (kg/m2). From 1988 to 1994, the 1977 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards were used to classify persons into one of four racial groups: White, Black, American Indian or Alaskan Native, or Asian or Pacific Islander. For 1999–2010, the revised 1997 OMB standards were used. Persons could select one or more of five racial groups: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Included in the total are racial groups not shown separately. Beginning in 1999, racial categories represent persons reporting only one race. Data from 1999 onward are not directly comparable with data from earlier years. Persons of Mexican origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Indicator Health3: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who reported they had illicit drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 2002–2012
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who reported they had illicit drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 2002–2012

NOTE: For data before 2003, the 1977 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards for data on race and ethnicity were used to classify persons into racial groups. The revised 1997 OMB standards were used for data from 2003 and later years. Data from 2003 onward are not directly comparable with data from earlier years. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Indicator Health4: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who reported they had at least one Major Depressive Episode (MDE) in the past year by gender, 2005–2012, and at least one MDE with severe impairment in the past year by gender, 2008–2012
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who reported they had at least one Major Depressive Episode (MDE) in the past year by gender, 2005–2012, and at least one MDE with severe impairment in the past year by gender, 2008–2012

a In 2008, a split-sample design assigned adults ages 18 or older randomly to one of two impairment scales, the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) or the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). For comparability purposes, estimates for Major Depressive Episode (MDE) among persons who received treatment for depression in 2008 are based only on the WHODAS half-sample. For details, see Section B.4.3 in Appendix B of the Results from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings.

NOTE: New adult mental health questions were added to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) questionnaire, which caused discontinuities in trends for MDE and for MDE with severe impairment among adults. However, an adjustment was applied to estimates of MDE that were affected by these questionnaire changes to allow trends in MDE among adults ages 18–24 from 2005 to 2012 to be included in this figure.

SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Indicator Health5: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who received treatment for sexually transmitted diseases in the past year by gender, 2002 and 2006–2010
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who received treatment for sexually transmitted diseases in the past year by gender, 2002 and 2006–2010

NOTE: Young adults were identified as receiving treatment if they answered "yes" to the following question: "In the last 12 months, have you been treated or received medication from a doctor or other medical care provider for a sexually transmitted disease like gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes, or syphilis?"

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Survey of Family Growth.

Indicator Health6.A: Death rates among young adults ages 18–24, all causes, all injury causes, and selected mechanisms of injury, 1990–2010
Death rates among young adults ages 18–24, all causes, all injury causes, and selected mechanisms of injury, 1990–2010

Indicator Health6.B: Homicide and suicide rates among young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, and gender, 2010
Homicide and suicide rates among young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, and gender, 2010

NOTE: The 1977 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards for data on race and ethnicity were used. Data for Hispanic origin and specified race populations other than White, non-Hispanic and Black, non-Hispanic should be interpreted with caution because of inconsistencies between reporting race and Hispanic origin on death certificates, censuses, and surveys.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System.

Indicator Health7: Nonfatal violent victimization rate per 1,000 persons ages 18–24 by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 1993–2012
Nonfatal violent victimization rate per 1,000 persons ages 18–24 by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 1993–2012

NOTE: For data before 2003, the 1977 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards for data on race and ethnicity were used to classify persons into racial groups. The revised 1997 OMB standards were used for data from 2003 and later years. Data from 2003 onward are not directly comparable with data from earlier years. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey.